Trees

The City of Fernandina Beach Tree Ordinance is dedicated to:


  • No net loss of trees.
  • Placing structures and all impervious surfaces in such a way as to protect the survivability and substantial growth of the healthiest trees on a property.
  • Maintaining the diversity of tree species native to Amelia Island.
  • Protecting and maintaining the existing mature growth native trees important to the City’s tree canopy.
  • Preserving, enhancing and restoring the unique aesthetic character of the City.
  • Preserving, enhancing and restoring the natural environment through the protection and establishment of native trees and existing natural systems for the enjoyment of present and future populations.
The City's tree protection requirements are found in Section 4.05.09 of the Land Development Code: Tree Protection Requirements, LDC Section 4.05.09

Penalties specific to the violation of tree permit requirements are found in Section 11.08.04 of the Land Development Code: Specific Penalties for Violation of Tree Protection Requirements, LDC 11.08.04
 
View the City of Fernandina Beach Street Tree Management Plan.

Permitting



Arbor Day


Group photo of volunteers from the Arbor Day 2020 planting.
2020 Arbor Day Tree Planting at the Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Center. 

Tree City USA


The City of Fernandina Beach has been named a Tree City USA® Community for 2019 by the Arbor Day Foundation. Fernandina Beach also received the Tree City USA® designation in the following years: 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 2005, 2007-2014.

The Benefits of Trees


Trees provide many benefits to the community. They can help reduce energy costs, they may add value to your home, they provide food for wildlife, they can improve water quality and reduce stormwater runoff, and they make commercial areas more attractive to customers. If you want to learn more about the benefits of trees, click on the links below:

Do you want to read more about the benefits of street trees? Please read 22 Benefits of Urban Street Trees written by Dan Burden, Partner and Senior Urban Designer - Glatting Jackson Kercher and Anglin. This article was published in "The Council Quarterly 2011 Issue Two" published by the Florida Urban Forestry Council.

Find out how trees help manage stormwater runoff by clicking on this interactive poster on the Arbor Day Foundation's website: Trees Tame Stormwater - Interactive Poster